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Upcoming events

    • Wednesday, May 01, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, May 02, 2019
    • 5:00 PM
    • Environmental Services Building, Tacoma (University Place)
    • 1
    Register

    This two-day course will increase your ability to design, conduct, and control meetings in public forums. This course is designed to increase your ability to plan and facilitate a meeting (or a series of meetings) that minimize conflict and enhance problem solving. Collaboration is often cited as a good way to address coastal resource management issues, but the collaborative process is complicated, requiring a systematic approach. This course provides the skills and tools to design and implement collaborative approaches. The skills will be useful even when attending, but not running, a collaborative meeting.

     

    After completing this course, you will be able to:

    • Determine if a collaborative process is appropriate
    • Select people with the skill sets needed to fill each meeting role
    • Learn and practice facilitation skills
    • Use appropriate process tools and techniques to address the meeting objectives
    • Manage conflict in meetings by understanding group dynamics
    • Identify disruptive behaviors in group processes and practice strategies to deal with them

    This course is taught by national trainers from NOAA's Office for Coastal Management and is a special offering in this year's training schedule. (14 CM AICP credits/ CEP points)


    Lunch is provided.


    Instructors:  Jan Kuklick joined NOAA's Office for Coastal Management (OCM) in June 1997 as a coastal management specialist. She has been working in the field of coastal and marine science since 1989 and has extensive experience in facilitation and meeting coordination and management. Before joining OCM, she worked in the area of oil spill response, damage assessment, and contingency planning. She holds a master of science in marine biology from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and a bachelor of science in biology from the College of William and Mary.


    Gwen Shaughnessy brings a background in marine biology and non-traditional education to NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management (OCM), which she joined in 2011. In her current role as a Senior Coastal Management Specialist in the OCM Engagement, Training, and Education Program, she is the national coordinator and lead trainer for a two-day climate adaptation training course. Building capacity in local communities to better understand the risks, strategies, and choices for how to adapt to the impacts of a changing climate is a focus of her work.



    • Tuesday, May 07, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 0
    Join waitlist

      

    (Due to an instructor conflict, the date was changed on this class to May 7.)


    This course is designed to provide participants with a general overview of the purpose of SEPA, the procedural requirements of the SEPA rules, and how SEPA can be used in decision-making. You will learn how to determine when SEPA environmental review is required, evaluate a proposal and make a threshold determination, issue SEPA documents, and use SEPA supplemental authority to condition or deny a proposal. It will also include a section on nonproject environmental analysis and NEPA-SEPA integration. The class is geared towards lead agencies, but it is also applicable to consultants for project applicants. (6 AICP credits)

                

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructor: Annie Szvetecz has been a senior planner and policy analyst for Ecology since 2004 and currently oversees the statewide administration of the State Environmental Policy Act including the statewide Register, rulemaking, guidance, training and technical assistance.  She has a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana and a J.D. from Lewis and Clark School of Law.



    • Thursday, May 09, 2019
    • Thursday, May 30, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    (rescheduled to May, due to snow)

    Do you speak at conferences, public meetings, or other events where you need to convey a specific message? Have you ever felt like you didn’t quite hit the mark by the lackluster reactions of your audience members? Would you like to authentically engage people and help them to consider a different point of view?

    This two-day class (Feb 13 & 27) features best practices for designing presentations and is especially geared towards scientists and professionals who work for local and state agencies.
     
    In this class, you will learn how to:

    •  Transform the way you do PowerPoint;
    •  Use visuals in a way that has impact;
    •   Make your message memorable;
    •   Tell a compelling story;
    •   Create rapport with your audience;
    •   Present data in an accessible way;
    •   Drill down to your most important message.

    The classes will be held two weeks apart. In between, you will develop a short presentation to present to the class on Day Two. This is an opportunity for you to immediately apply what you've learned and to receive positive coaching and feedback. (14 CM AICP Credits/ CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors:
    Cathy Angell coordinates the Coastal Training Program and has a long history of designing and delivering presentations, as well as coaching others.
    She specializes in presentation skills for educators, scientists, and public officials. A former member of the National Speaker’s Association, she has presented at conferences, colleges, business organizations, and retreats. She recently received a communication award from NOAA named in her honor.

    Nicole Faghin is a Coastal Management Specialist at Washington Sea Grant. She is a trained land use and environmental planner and lawyer specializing in waterfront planning issues. Nicole is a frequent lecturer for the Coastal Training Program and on the CTP Advisory Group. She has also taught courses at the UW Seattle Urban Planning Program, UW Tacoma Urban Studies Program, and has been a guest lecturer at the UW School of Marine and Environmental Affairs.

    • Thursday, May 09, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, May 30, 2019
    • 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    Register

     

    If the class is full, please sign up for this waiting list. We will contact you if a space becomes available.


    (The waiting list also helps us know how much demand there is for a course.) 


    • Wednesday, May 15, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, May 16, 2019
    • 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This 2-day training provides information and methods for determining the ordinary high water mark (OHWM) as defined in the state Shoreline Management Act (SMA).  Waters regulated under the SMA include all tidal waters, streams greater than 20 cubic feet per second mean annual flow, water bodies greater than 20 acres in size and any associated wetlands and deltas.  Field visits to each of the SMA water types will give you the opportunity to apply the methods discussed in the classroom.        

                           

    In this training, you will learn answers to these questions:      

    - How is the OHWM defined and where does it apply?

    - What is the regulatory context and history of the OHWM?

    - Why it is important to use field indicators to determine the OHWM?

    - What are the most reliable field indicators on tidal waters, streams, lakes and associated wetlands?

    - What are some common misconceptions about OHWM determinations?

    (12 AICP CM Credits / CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors: Diane Hennessey has specialized in the ecology, protection, and restoration of aquatic systems for 17 years.  She has worked as an aquatic resource scientist in private consulting and currently works as a Wetland Specialist for Washington State Department of Ecology. Her work has included stream, wetland, and wildlife habitat studies including delineation of both wetland and stream ordinary high water mark boundaries; preparing, reviewing, and issuing environmental permits; planning, design, and preparing aquatic restoration plans; monitoring mitigation and restoration projects; providing technical assistance in aquatic resource protection and conservation to local governments; and compliance monitoring of permits and violations. She has also been an instructor for the University of Washington-Seattle Wetland Science and Management Certificate Program since 2005 and has taught Wetlands Science and Ecological Processes; and Wetlands Identification and Delineation.   


    Rick Mraz is a certified Professional Wetland Scientist who works as a Shorelands Technical and Regulatory Lead. He began his career in wetlands work in Lee County, Florida in 1987. He has worked as a field biologist and environmental planner with local, state and federal agencies in Washington since 2001. Rick has degrees in Geology, Field Biology and Philosophy.


    Lynn Schmidt is the Department of Ecology’s Statewide Flood Engineer, focusing on reducing flood risks to communities while enhancing natural floodplain functions. Her career has spanned a wide range of topics within the environmental and hydraulics engineering fields, including hydraulic modeling, river restoration, floodplain management, stormwater management, environmental investigations, and monitoring. Lynn holds a BS in Civil Engineering, MS in Environmental Engineering, and is a Professional Engineer and Certified Floodplain Manager.

    • Wednesday, May 22, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, May 23, 2019
    • 4:30 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Join waitlist


    This two-day class is geared towards those who design and implement compensatory mitigation and restoration projects and/or those who review and condition mitigation plans who want more technical information. This class focuses on factors to consider when designing wetland projects and protocols to help ensure their success.



    Topic include:

    • Factors to consider for site selection
    • How to develop realistic site-specific goals and objectives and measurable performance standards
    • Water (sources and potential hydroperiods - what to look for and evaluate)
    • Soils (salvaging, amendments, compaction)
    • Vegetation (source of plant material, salvaging, planting specifications, improving survival, establishing appropriate vegetation communities)
    • Invasive species (techniques for control and maintenance)
    • Habitat (design considerations)
    • Plan specifications (mulches, irrigation, plant materials, habitat features)
    • Construction and installation considerations
    • Contingencies, maintenance, and monitoring

    Class participants should already have a general understanding of wetland ecology and regulations.

    Note: The information provided in this class is generally consistent with the 2006 interagency document, “Wetland Mitigation in Washington State,” Parts 1 and 2. However, it does not address the agencies’ specific policies and requirements for mitigation. The interagency mitigation guidance document can be found at:

    https://ecology.wa.gov/Water-Shorelines/Wetlands/Mitigation/Interagency-guidance

    (13 CM Credits)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors:  Susan Buis is a restoration ecologist and native plant horticulturist currently working for the US Army Corps of Engineers and the WA State Dept of Transportation. She is also co-founder and former co-owner of Sound Native Plants, an Olympia company that provides a full spectrum of restoration services including design, installation, native plant propagation, maintenance, and monitoring. Before founding her company in 1991, she worked for Yosemite and Olympic National Parks, where she developed and managed restoration projects and native plant propagation. Ms. Buis has been teaching workshops in restoration design and installation to professional groups and agencies since 1996 and has published articles on creating restoration plant specifications in Hortus West and in Native Plants Journal. She is a regular guest lecturer on native plant topics in the coastal NW.

     

    Lisa Palazzi is a Certified Professional Wetland Scientist (SWS-PCP) and a Certified Professional Soil Scientist (SSSA).  She has over 28 years of professional experience evaluating wetlands, soils and hydrology in the Pacific Northwest. Ms. Palazzi has provided expert advice and expert witness services on many hydric soils and wetlands hydrology functions in the Puget Sound region to many different municipalities and agencies. She consistently receives high marks as a teacher from her students and from workshop participants in these subjects, and she has taught in many different settings, ranging from University-level certification courses to professional conference workshops and even as a guest speaker in elementary, middle school and high school classes. Therefore, she is not only technically competent in her field of expertise, but capable of explaining that knowledge to a wide range of audiences. She is familiar with the most common mistakes and misinterpretations of soils and hydrology characteristics made that can cause a restoration project to fail. 


     


    • Thursday, June 06, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Environmental Services Center, Tacoma (University Place)
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This class reviews the geologic processes shaping Puget Sound beaches, such as erosion and sediment transport, and the influence of human activities on these processes. This year we’ve updated the class to include more emphasis on factors influencing the selection and design of erosion control measures.  We will look at a variety of softer techniques that are being used to reduce the impacts of conventional shoreline structures.  You’ll learn about recent guidance regarding the design and the review of soft shoreline and beach restoration projects. The class will include numerous examples that help you better understand the factors influencing a particular site and that highlight reasons for successful, and unsuccessful, shoreline projects.

    (6.5 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

    Instructor: Hugh Shipman has been a coastal geologist with the Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program of the Department of Ecology since 1989. His interests include shoreline erosion and longshore transport, coastal hazards, beach nourishment and restoration, and the environmental impacts of shoreline modification. Hugh provides technical assistance to local, state, and federal agencies; participates in a variety of technical and scientific workgroups; and educates property owners and coastal communities about shoreline processes. Hugh received his bachelor's degree in Earth Sciences and Engineering from Dartmouth in 1981 and his masters in Geological Sciences from the University of Washington in 1986. Hugh grew up near the coast of Maine, but moved to the Puget Sound region in 1983.

    • Wednesday, June 19, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    In this one-day class, you will gain familiarity with the contents and use of the Marine Shoreline Design Guidelines (MSDG). These guidelines address the design of alternative options for shoreline protection. The course will emphasize how to conduct a site assessment and alternatives analysis, along with a high-level overview of the permitting issues associated with these types of projects. Examples will be explored for different techniques to address shoreline protection. You will learn how to use a checklist approach to analyze alternative shoreline protection options. While not required, it would benefit you to have a familiarity with the basic understanding of shoreline processes as taught in the Coastal Training Program course "Puget Sound Coastal Process, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration." (6.5 CM Credits)


    Lunch is provided.


    Instructors: Corey Morss is an Environmental Engineer working for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Habitat Program. Corey provides technical assistance to WDFW Habitat Biologists statewide, as well as designing and constructing restoration projects in marine and freshwater environments. Corey has developed and delivered trainings on water crossings, marine shoreline protection (MSDG), fluvial geomorphology, reading engineering plans, and fish friendly construction considerations. Corey is passionate about the outdoors and spends most of his spare time hiking, camping, backpacking, hunting, fishing, boating or dreaming about those things.


    Nicole Faghin is a Coastal Management Specialist at Washington Sea Grant. She is a trained land use and environmental planner and lawyer specializing in waterfront planning issues. Nicole is a frequent lecturer for the Coastal Training Program and on the CTP Advisory Group. She has also taught courses at the UW Seattle Urban Planning Program, UW Tacoma Urban Studies Program, and has been a guest lecturer at the UW School of Marine and Environmental Affairs.


Past events

Wednesday, April 17, 2019 Designing and Installing Mitigation and Restoration Projects
Thursday, April 11, 2019 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 03, 2019 Planning Effective Projects
Wednesday, March 20, 2019 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 14, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, March 13, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, March 06, 2019 Plant Identification in Central and Eastern Washington Habitats
Wednesday, February 20, 2019 Winter Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Wednesday, January 30, 2019 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Tuesday, November 27, 2018 Environmental Negotiations
Wednesday, November 14, 2018 Gaining Project Traction with Stakeholders: Strategies for Effective and Efficient Engagement
Thursday, November 08, 2018 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Tuesday, October 30, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 03, 2018 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 26, 2018 Lower Your Risk: Taking the Mystery out of Cultural Resource Management
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 Facilitation Skills for Scientists, Planners and Resource Managers
Wednesday, September 12, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Friday, June 29, 2018 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Thursday, June 28, 2018 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 20, 2018 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 06, 2018 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Thursday, May 31, 2018 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, May 23, 2018 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Thursday, May 17, 2018 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 08, 2018 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 Gaining Project Traction with Stakeholders: Strategies for Effective and Efficient Engagement
Thursday, March 15, 2018 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Thursday, March 08, 2018 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, February 15, 2018 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, January 31, 2018 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Monday, January 29, 2018 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Tuesday, December 12, 2017 Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 Environmental Negotiations
Monday, October 16, 2017 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings
Thursday, October 12, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, October 05, 2017 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 04, 2017 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 14, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Tuesday, June 13, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 07, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Tuesday, June 06, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, May 25, 2017 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 Enhancing Your Presentations: Additional Techniques for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 02, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, April 20, 2017 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Thursday, April 13, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 16, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Wednesday, February 01, 2017 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, January 19, 2017 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, January 11, 2017 How to Communicate about Sea Level Rise
Tuesday, December 06, 2016 Planning Effective Projects
Tuesday, November 08, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, November 03, 2016 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Thursday, October 13, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Identifying Wetlands of High Conservation Value Using Vegetation Classification and the Ecological Integrity Assessment (EIA)
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Thursday, June 09, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, June 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, June 02, 2016 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 04, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, April 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, April 06, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, March 22, 2016 Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
Wednesday, March 02, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Tuesday, February 23, 2016 Environmental Negotiations
Thursday, February 18, 2016 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, February 03, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)
Thursday, January 14, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Tuesday, December 01, 2015 Climate Adaptation for Coastal Communities
Thursday, November 19, 2015 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, October 08, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, September 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, June 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Thursday, May 28, 2015 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 Environmental Negotiations
Wednesday, May 06, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, April 16, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Eastern Washington
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 12, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Western Washington - $95
Thursday, March 05, 2015 How to Administer Development Permits in Eastern Washington’s Shorelines - $75
Thursday, February 26, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials - $125
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $190
Thursday, February 05, 2015 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $95
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25

Washington State Department of Ecology 

 

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