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Upcoming events

    • Wednesday, September 11, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This 1-day training will demonstrate the Department of Fish and Wildlife’s methods for conducting beach surveys and processing samples for Surf Smelt and Sand Lance spawn.  The training will include a classroom component with a presentation and hands-on demonstration of lab techniques. It will also include a field component with a demonstration and time to practice field collection and sample processing. The training is specifically designed for biologists who need to conduct forage fish surveys for regulatory purposes, such as to comply with the conditions of a WDFW, DNR, or ACoE permit. At the conclusion of training, participants will have knowledge of forage fish survey techniques and reporting requirements.

    (6 AICP CM Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructor:  Hannah Faulkner is a nearshore biologist with the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife Habitat Science Team. Her current research interests include monitoring effects of shoreline modification on nearshore habitat, identifying and assessing the distribution and characteristics of forage fish spawning habitat, assessing new methods of detecting forage fish spawn, monitoring the implementation of marine bulkhead HPA permits, and exploring new survey methods and data processing techniques using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS).

    • Thursday, September 12, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This 1-day training will demonstrate the Department of Fish and Wildlife’s methods for conducting beach surveys and processing samples for Surf Smelt and Sand Lance spawn.  The training will include a classroom component with a presentation and hands-on demonstration of lab techniques. It will also include a field component with a demonstration and time to practice field collection and sample processing. The training is specifically designed for biologists who need to conduct forage fish surveys for regulatory purposes, such as to comply with the conditions of a WDFW, DNR, or ACoE permit. At the conclusion of training, participants will have knowledge of forage fish survey techniques and reporting requirements.

    (6 AICP CM Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructor:  Hannah Faulkner is a nearshore biologist with the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife Habitat Science Team. Her current research interests include monitoring effects of shoreline modification on nearshore habitat, identifying and assessing the distribution and characteristics of forage fish spawning habitat, assessing new methods of detecting forage fish spawn, monitoring the implementation of marine bulkhead HPA permits, and exploring new survey methods and data processing techniques using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS).

    • Tuesday, September 17, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, September 19, 2019
    • 5:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 5
    Register
    This popular facilitation training will provide you with the skills needed to plan, design and facilitate meetings more effectively, with lower anxiety and better meeting outcomes.  We present principles needed for successful meetings of any size, from small staff meetings to large controversial public meetings.

    This course is intended to be a practical approach to improving group meetings. It is oriented specifically to the needs of scientists, planners and resource managers. Core facilitation skills are presented and practiced during class. Students are presented with a wide array of tools and opportunities to practice new facilitation skills and receive feedback in a safe environment. Participants will be asked to complete a pre-workshop skills profile and the class will be tailored to meet the class’s needs.

    Students will be provided an overview of the competencies required for effective meetings. These competencies include:

    • The ability to assess needs and design meetings to serve the purpose of the meeting and the interests of meeting participants
    • Understanding the roles and responsibilities of the facilitator, assist team, meeting leader, participants, etc.
    • Managing and facilitating meetings
    • Facilitating as a leader – balancing two roles
    • Information gathering and presentation techniques
    • Communication skills and practice (Verbal skills, Nonverbal skills, Recording skills)
    • Basic visual facilitation techniques
    • Decision-making processes
    • Evaluation processes

    (21 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

    Instructor:  Jim Nelson held several responsible positions with the California Department of Fish and Game until he retired at the end of 2006. Since then, he has owned and operated Nelson Facilitation LLC.  Since the early 1990's Jim has pursued the study and practice of facilitation, negotiation, and mediation for environmental problem solving. He has facilitated many meetings, small and large, simple and complex, friendly and controversial. He brings a wealth of training and experience to share in creating grace and ease in your meetings.

    • Wednesday, September 25, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Enduris Training Center, Spokane
    • 0

    THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED - We plan to offer it in fall 2020.


    This one-day class will provide wetland regulators and consultants with a practical tool for calculating if mitigation projects will adequately replace the functions and values lost to altered wetlands. The class is based on a method developed by the Department of Ecology called "Calculating Credits and Debits for Compensatory Mitigation in Wetlands of Eastern Washington" (Ecology Publication #11-06-15). This method is designed to provide guidance for both regulators and applicants during two stages of the mitigation process: 1) estimating the functions and values lost when a wetland is altered, and 2) estimating the gain in functions and values that result from the mitigation.

     

    The Credit Debit Method is based on the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Eastern Washington (Ecology publications #04-06-015 and #14-06-030). This workshop however does not provide training in the wetland rating system. Training in the wetland rating system is strongly suggested as a PRE-REQUISITE for this workshop.

     

    You will receive a copy of the “Eastern Washington Credit-Debit” manual. The morning session will be held inside. The afternoon session will be conducted in local wetlands, so dress appropriately. (6 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Note:  This class will qualify you to use the 2014 Wetland Rating System if you have already taken the 2-day training in the older 2004 rating system in Eastern WA.

     

    Instructors:  Dr. Amy Yahnke is the senior wetland ecologist for the Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program at the Washington State Department of Ecology. She holds a Certificate in Wetland Science and Management, BS in Environmental Horticulture, MS in Forest Resources, and PhD in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. She has studied wetland ecology within the contexts of amphibians, invasive plants, and stormwater management. Dr. Yahnke has experience teaching a wide range of environmental topics to audiences of all ages.

     

    Jacob McCann is the Wetlands/Shorelands/Enforcement Specialist serving Adams, Ferry, Franklin, Garfield, Grant, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Spokane, and Walla Walla Counties. Though a California native, Jacob is a proud EWU Eagle and has happily called Spokane home for over 20 years. 

     

    • Tuesday, October 01, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This class will teach you how to effectively use the Hydric Soil Indicators in the Regional Supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual. You will learn the basic processes that take place in saturated soil, and how to “read the story” in a soil profile. The training includes an introduction to identifying layers, distinguishing concentrations and depletions, and preparing hydric soil descriptions from soil profiles. Each student will have a chance to describe soil profiles and apply the field indicators to their notes.

     

    This workshop will be indoors, with an exercise in the field. Please dress appropriately. (6.5 CM AICP Credits/ CEP Points)

     

    Required class materials to bring:

    • A copy of the Munsell Soil Color Charts and one of the following publications:
    • The Corps Regional Supplement for Western Mountains, Valleys, and Coast Region, or Arid West Region. They can be found at: http://www.usace.army.mil/Portals/2/docs/civilworks/regulatory/reg_supp/west_mt_finalsupp.pdf
    • Or The Field Indicators for Hydric Soils (updated version 8.1) This can be found at: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs142p2_053171.pdf
    • a sharpshooter or tile spade style shovel (if you have one)
    • soil knife
    • tape measure
    • spray bottle for water (if you have one)

    Lunch is provided.


    Instructor: Bob Thomas is a biologist and soil scientist for the Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, Regulatory Branch Branch.  He has extensive experience in the Pacific Northwest in routine delineations, delineations in disturbed areas, and problematic hydric soils.  Mr. Thomas has been teaching hydric soil and delineation workshops to professional groups and agencies since 2000.

     

    • Wednesday, October 09, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, October 10, 2019
    • 4:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This training provides information and methods for determining the ordinary high water mark (OHWM) as defined in the state Shoreline Management Act (SMA).  Waters regulated under the SMA include all tidal waters, streams greater than 20 cubic feet per second mean annual flow, water bodies greater than 20 acres in size and any associated wetlands and deltas.  Field visits to each of the SMA water types will give you the opportunity to apply the methods discussed in the classroom.        

                           

    In this training, you will learn answers to these questions:      

    - How is the OHWM defined and where does it apply?

    - What is the regulatory context and history of the OHWM?

    - Why it is important to use field indicators to determine the OHWM?

    - What are the most reliable field indicators on tidal waters, streams, lakes and associated wetlands?

    - What are some common misconceptions about OHWM determinations?

    (12 AICP CM Credits / CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors: 


    Doug Gresham is a certified Professional Wetland Scientist who has worked as a wetland specialist with the Department of Ecology for the last 5 years. He has 24 years of consulting experience as a wetland and fisheries biologist working throughout the Pacific NW and Alaska.  This work included wetland delineations, stream surveys, water quality monitoring, ordinary high water mark flagging; and monitoring of mitigation projects; He is also an instructor at the University of Washington for the Wetland Science and Management Certificate Program where he teaches the Wetland Identification and Delineation class.  Doug has a BS in Biology with an emphasis in Fisheries and a MS in Biology specializing in Limnology.


    Diane Hennessey has specialized in the ecology, protection, and restoration of aquatic systems for 17 years.  She has worked as an aquatic resource scientist in private consulting and currently works as a Wetland Specialist for Washington State Department of Ecology. Her work has included stream, wetland, and wildlife habitat studies including delineation of both wetland and stream ordinary high water mark boundaries; preparing, reviewing, and issuing environmental permits; planning, design, and preparing aquatic restoration plans; monitoring mitigation and restoration projects; providing technical assistance in aquatic resource protection and conservation to local governments; and compliance monitoring of permits and violations. She has also been an instructor for the University of Washington-Seattle Wetland Science and Management Certificate Program since 2005 and has taught Wetlands Science and Ecological Processes; and Wetlands Identification and Delineation.   

     

    Rick Mraz is a certified Professional Wetland Scientist who works as a Shorelands Technical and Regulatory Lead. He began his career in wetlands work in Lee County, Florida in 1987. He has worked as a field biologist and environmental planner with local, state and federal agencies in Washington since 2001. Rick has degrees in Geology, Field Biology and Philosophy.

     

    Lynn Schmidt is the Department of Ecology’s Statewide Flood Engineer, focusing on reducing flood risks to communities while enhancing natural floodplain functions. Her career has spanned a wide range of topics within the environmental and hydraulics engineering fields, including hydraulic modeling, river restoration, floodplain management, stormwater management, environmental investigations, and monitoring. Lynn holds a BS in Civil Engineering, MS in Environmental Engineering, and is a Professional Engineer and Certified Floodplain Manager.

     

    • Wednesday, October 16, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, October 17, 2019
    • 4:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 0
    Join waitlist
    This two-day intensive workshop will provide wetland regulators and consultants with practical information and experience in using the revised rating system for wetlands in western Washington. It is specifically designed for those who will be using the rating system in the field. You will gain a working knowledge of topics such as the hydrogeomorphic classification of wetlands, how to separate wetlands into units for rating, and how to answer all the questions on the field form. The purpose of the class is to provide you with knowledge so that you can fill out the rating form on your own. You will receive a copy of the revised rating system.

    It is important that you already have some experience and/or education in delineating wetlands and identifying natural wetland features such as outlets, boundaries of basins, vegetation classes, and some ability to distinguish between different plant species. The morning sessions will be held inside. The afternoon sessions will be conducted in local wetlands, so dress appropriately. (12 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)
     
    Link to rating system:

    https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/publications/SummaryPages/1406029.html

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors:  Dr. Amy Yahnke is the senior wetland ecologist for the Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program at the Washington State Department of Ecology. She holds a Certificate in Wetland Science and Management, BS in Environmental Horticulture, MS in Forest Resources, and PhD in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. She has studied wetland ecology within the contexts of amphibians, invasive plants, and stormwater management. Dr. Yahnke has experience teaching a wide range of environmental topics to audiences of all ages.

     

    Zach Meyer is a Wetlands/Shorelands Specialist with the WA State Department of Ecology. In the last few years with Ecology, Zach has been involved in environmental planning, permitting, and providing technical assistance to local jurisdictions.  Zach’s educational background includes a Master’s degree in Marine and Environmental Affairs from the University of Washington, and undergraduate studies in anthropology and biology from Indiana University. 

     

    • Friday, November 01, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Confluence Technology Center, Wenatchee
    • 0
    Join waitlist

      This course is designed to provide participants with a general overview of the purpose of SEPA, the procedural requirements of the SEPA rules, and how SEPA can be used in decision-making. You will learn how to determine when SEPA environmental review is required, evaluate a proposal and make a threshold determination, issue SEPA documents, and use SEPA supplemental authority to condition or deny a proposal. It will also include a section on nonproject environmental analysis and NEPA-SEPA integration. The class is geared towards lead agencies, but it is also applicable to consultants for project applicants. (6 AICP credits)            

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructor: Annie Szvetecz has been a senior planner and policy analyst for Ecology since 2004 and currently oversees the statewide administration of the State Environmental Policy Act including the statewide Register, rulemaking, guidance, training and technical assistance.  She has a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana and a J.D. from Lewis and Clark School of Law.



    • Tuesday, November 05, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, November 07, 2019
    • 5:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 9
    Register

    This extremely popular 3-day training will provide you with improved skills for effectively participating in complex environmental negotiations. It will give you a better understanding of negotiation principles, approaches, and practices which will significantly improve the outcome of your negotiations.

    The class presents basic negotiation concepts (e.g., Fisher and Ury’s “Getting to Yes” series) and specific environmental issue applications. The skills taught help reduce anxiety about negotiating while helping you to achieve successful outcomes.
     

    You will learn:

    • Simple processes to prepare for negotiations
    • Negotiation principles through simulations and role playing of increasing complexity
    • Principled (ethical) negotiation approaches to build trust and relationships
    • To recognize commonly encountered tactics and shown productive responses

    (21 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

    Instructor:  Jim Nelson held several responsible positions with the California Department of Fish and Game until he retired at the end of 2006. While with DFG he worked on a wide variety projects including: habitat conservation and management projects, regional conservation planning projects, public information and outreach, and large-scale construction monitoring projects. Since the early 1990's Jim has pursued the study and practice of facilitation, negotiation, and mediation for environmental problem solving.
      

    • Wednesday, November 13, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, November 14, 2019
    • 4:30 PM
    • Confluence Technology Center, Wenatchee
    • 1
    Register
    This two-day intensive workshop will provide those working with fish habitat restoration practical information and experience in using the revised rating system for wetlands in eastern Washington. It is specifically designed for those who will be using the rating system in the field. You will gain a working knowledge of topics such as the hydrogeomorphic classification of wetlands, how to separate wetlands into units for rating, and how to answer all the questions on the field form. The purpose of the class is to provide you with knowledge so that you can fill out the rating form on your own. You will receive a copy of the revised rating system.

    It is important that you already have some experience and/or education in delineating wetlands and identifying natural wetland features such as outlets, boundaries of basins, vegetation classes, and some ability to distinguish between different plant species. The morning sessions will be held inside. The afternoon sessions will be conducted in local wetlands, so dress appropriately.
    Note: All cars driving to the field sites will need a Discover Pass. (13 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)
     
    Link to rating system:

    https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/publications/SummaryPages/1406030.html

     

    Lunch is provided.


    Instructors:  Dr. Amy Yahnke is the senior wetland ecologist for the Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program at the Washington State Department of Ecology. She holds a Certificate in Wetland Science and Management, BS in Environmental Horticulture, MS in Forest Resources, and PhD in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. She has studied wetland ecology within the contexts of amphibians, invasive plants, and stormwater management. Dr. Yahnke has experience teaching a wide range of environmental topics to audiences of all ages.


    Jacob McCann is the Wetlands/Shorelands/Enforcement Specialist serving Adams, Ferry, Franklin, Garfield, Grant, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Spokane, and Walla Walla Counties. Though a California native, Jacob is a proud EWU Eagle and has happily called Spokane home for over 20 years. He can be found snowboarding area mountains in the winter and hiking and gardening the rest of the year.


    Hallie Ladd is a Wetlands/Shorelines Specialist with the WA State Department of Ecology.  Hallie’s role at Ecology is to provide permitting and technical assistance to the local jurisdictions and citizens of Eastern Washington.  Her professional background includes work in aquatic ecology, fisheries, and natural resource damage assessment and restoration.  Hallie’s education includes a Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Minnesota State University Moorhead and a Master’s degree in Fisheries Science from Texas Tech University.

    • Friday, November 22, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Enduris Training Center, Spokane
    • 0
    Join waitlist

      

        

    This course is designed to provide participants with a general overview of the purpose of SEPA, the procedural requirements of the SEPA rules, and how SEPA can be used in decision-making. You will learn how to determine when SEPA environmental review is required, evaluate a proposal and make a threshold determination, issue SEPA documents, and use SEPA supplemental authority to condition or deny a proposal. It will also include a section on nonproject environmental analysis and NEPA-SEPA integration. The class is geared towards lead agencies, but it is also applicable to consultants for project applicants. (6 AICP credits/CEP Points)

                

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructor: Annie Szvetecz has been a senior planner and policy analyst for Ecology since 2004 and currently oversees the statewide administration of the State Environmental Policy Act including the statewide Register, rulemaking, guidance, training and technical assistance.  She has a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana and a J.D. from Lewis and Clark School of Law.



    • Wednesday, December 04, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, December 05, 2019
    • 4:30 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 12
    Register

    This two-day course is being offered for the second time as part of the Coastal Training Program's "Climate Adaptation Series." This training will help you:

    • Apply the basic elements of an adaptation planning framework to organize future preparedness efforts;
    • Translate climate science into impacts on local community assets;
    • Practice a qualitative approach to scope and compile a vulnerability assessment, and describe how to apply the results;
    • Identify, compare, and prioritize locally relevant adaptation strategies and actions;
    • Describe implementation options for different strategies;
    • Recognize the importance of stakeholder involvement in adaptation planning and demonstrate the applicability of engagement processes and tools.
    Opportunities for local collaboration and next steps for adaptation planning and implementation are emphasized through discussion, participant activities, and incorporation of local speakers and examples.

     

    The course is designed for, but not limited to, program administrators, land use planners, public works staff members, floodplain managers, hazard mitigation planners, emergency managers, community groups, members of civic organizations, and coastal resource managers. While the course is beneficial for individuals, we strongly encourage multiple members of your agency to attend. This will allow your group to work through challenging issues together to explore co-benefits of adaptation strategies. Note: This class includes inland shorelines, as well. (14 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.  

     


    Instructors:  John Rozum is a land use and geospatial training specialist for the Baldwin Group at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office for Coastal Management. John is extensively involved in numerous climate change–related trainings and projects, with a primary focus on the integration of geospatial tools and analysis into climate adaptation planning activities. He also has considerable experience helping communities integrate green infrastructure practices into their plans and regulations.  John is a certified land use planner with over 15 years’ experience working at the local level as a consultant, a planning commissioner and a university educator.  In 2013, he co-authored a publication entitled, Tools for Coastal Climate Adaptation Planning that is freely available at: www.natureserve.org/climatetoolsguide/. As of 2015, over 4,000 copies of the guide have been distributed worldwide.


    Gwen Shaughnessy brings a background in marine biology and non-traditional education to NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management (OCM), where she joined in February of 2011. In her current role as the Climate Adaptation Specialist in the OCM Engagement, Training, and Education Program, Ms. Shaughnessy is the national coordinator and lead trainer for a multi-day climate adaptation training course. Prior to joining NOAA, Ms. Shaughnessy worked with the Maryland Chesapeake & Coastal Program, where she helped staff the Adaptation and Response Working Group for the Maryland Commission on Climate Change and contributed to the State’s Climate Action Plan. Her responsibilities also included development of the CoastSmart Communities Initiative, a program designed to improve community resilience in the face of coastal hazards and climate change. Building capacity in local communities to better understand the risks, strategies, and choices for how to adapt to the impacts of a changing climate is a focus of Ms. Shaughnessy’s work.

Past events

Tuesday, July 09, 2019 Riparian and Wetland Plant Identification in Central and Eastern WA
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 Using the Marine Shoreline Design Guidelines for Marine Shoreline Stabilization
Thursday, June 06, 2019 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 Designing and Installing Mitigation and Restoration Projects
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Thursday, May 09, 2019 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Tuesday, May 07, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, May 01, 2019 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 Designing and Installing Mitigation and Restoration Projects
Thursday, April 11, 2019 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 03, 2019 Planning Effective Projects
Wednesday, March 20, 2019 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 14, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, March 13, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, March 06, 2019 Plant Identification in Central and Eastern Washington Habitats
Wednesday, February 20, 2019 Winter Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Wednesday, January 30, 2019 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Tuesday, November 27, 2018 Environmental Negotiations
Wednesday, November 14, 2018 Gaining Project Traction with Stakeholders: Strategies for Effective and Efficient Engagement
Thursday, November 08, 2018 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Tuesday, October 30, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 03, 2018 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 26, 2018 Lower Your Risk: Taking the Mystery out of Cultural Resource Management
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 Facilitation Skills for Scientists, Planners and Resource Managers
Wednesday, September 12, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Friday, June 29, 2018 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Thursday, June 28, 2018 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 20, 2018 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 06, 2018 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Thursday, May 31, 2018 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, May 23, 2018 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Thursday, May 17, 2018 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 08, 2018 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 Gaining Project Traction with Stakeholders: Strategies for Effective and Efficient Engagement
Thursday, March 15, 2018 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Thursday, March 08, 2018 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, February 15, 2018 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, January 31, 2018 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Monday, January 29, 2018 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Tuesday, December 12, 2017 Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 Environmental Negotiations
Monday, October 16, 2017 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings
Thursday, October 12, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, October 05, 2017 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 04, 2017 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 14, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Tuesday, June 13, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 07, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Tuesday, June 06, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, May 25, 2017 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 Enhancing Your Presentations: Additional Techniques for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 02, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, April 20, 2017 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Thursday, April 13, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 16, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Wednesday, February 01, 2017 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, January 19, 2017 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, January 11, 2017 How to Communicate about Sea Level Rise
Tuesday, December 06, 2016 Planning Effective Projects
Tuesday, November 08, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, November 03, 2016 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Thursday, October 13, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Identifying Wetlands of High Conservation Value Using Vegetation Classification and the Ecological Integrity Assessment (EIA)
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Thursday, June 09, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, June 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, June 02, 2016 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 04, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, April 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, April 06, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, March 22, 2016 Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
Wednesday, March 02, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Tuesday, February 23, 2016 Environmental Negotiations
Thursday, February 18, 2016 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, February 03, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)
Thursday, January 14, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Tuesday, December 01, 2015 Climate Adaptation for Coastal Communities
Thursday, November 19, 2015 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, October 08, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, September 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, June 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Thursday, May 28, 2015 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 Environmental Negotiations
Wednesday, May 06, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, April 16, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Eastern Washington
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 12, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Western Washington - $95
Thursday, March 05, 2015 How to Administer Development Permits in Eastern Washington’s Shorelines - $75
Thursday, February 26, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials - $125
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $190
Thursday, February 05, 2015 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $95
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25

Washington State Department of Ecology 

 

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