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Upcoming events

    • Wednesday, September 13, 2017
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, September 14, 2017
    • 4:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 7
    This two-day intensive workshop will provide wetland regulators and consultants with practical information and experience in using the revised rating system for wetlands in western Washington. It is specifically designed for those who will be using the rating system in the field. You will gain a working knowledge of topics such as the hydrogeomorphic classification of wetlands, how to separate wetlands into units for rating, and how to answer all the questions on the field form. The purpose of the class is to provide you with knowledge so that you can fill out the rating form on your own. You will receive a copy of the revised rating system.

    It is important that you already have some experience and/or education in delineating wetlands and identifying natural wetland features such as outlets, boundaries of basins, vegetation classes, and some ability to distinguish between different plant species. The morning sessions will be held inside. The afternoon sessions will be conducted in local wetlands, so dress appropriately. (12 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)
     
    Link to rating system:
    https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/publications/SummaryPages/1406029.html

     

    Lunch is provided.


    Instructors:  Dr. Amy Yahnke is the senior wetland ecologist for the Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program at the Washington State Department of Ecology. She holds a Certificate in Wetland Science and Management, BS in Environmental Horticulture, MS in Forest Resources, and PhD in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. She has studied wetland ecology within the contexts of amphibians, invasive plants, and stormwater management. Dr. Yahnke has experience teaching a wide range of environmental topics to audiences of all ages.


    Doug Gresham is a wetland specialist in Ecology’s Northwest Region and he has 24 years of consulting experience in wetlands, fisheries, water quality monitoring, mitigation design and monitoring, construction inspection, and permitting. He provides technical assistance on wetland protection to government agencies and consultants within Snohomish, Skagit, and San Juan Counties.  He also conducts verification of consultant’s wetland delineations and ordinary high water mark determinations, and assesses the adequacy of their mitigation site designs and monitoring programs. 

    • Thursday, October 12, 2017
    • Thursday, October 26, 2017
    • 2 sessions
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 15

    Do you speak at conferences, public meetings, or other events where you need to convey a specific message? Have you ever felt like you didn’t quite hit the mark by the lackluster reactions of your audience members? Would you like to authentically engage people and help them to consider a different point of view?

    This two-day training class features best practices for presenting data and is especially geared towards scientists and professionals who work for local and state agencies.
     
    In this class, you will learn how to:

    •   Use visuals in a way that has impact;
    •   Make your message memorable;
    •   Tell a compelling story;
    •   Create rapport with your audience;
    •   Present data in an accessible way;
    •   Drill down to your most important message;
    •   Transform the way you do PowerPoint.

    The classes will be held two weeks apart. In between, you will develop a short presentation to present to the class on Day Two. This is an opportunity for you to immediately apply what you've learned and to receive positive coaching and feedback. (14 CM AICP Credits/ CEP Points)


    Lunch is provided.


    Instructors:
    Cathy Angell coordinates the Coastal Training Program and has a long history of designing and delivering presentations, as well as coaching others.
    She specializes in presentation skills for educators, scientists, and public officials. A former member of the National Speaker’s Association, she has presented at conferences, colleges, business organizations, and retreats. She recently received a communication award from NOAA named in her honor.

    Nicole Faghin is a Coastal Management Specialist at Washington Sea Grant. She is a trained land use and environmental planner and lawyer specializing in waterfront planning issues. Nicole is a frequent lecturer for the Coastal Training Program and on the CTP Advisory Group. She has also taught courses at the UW Seattle Urban Planning Program, UW Tacoma Urban Studies Program, and has been a guest lecturer at the UW School of Marine and Environmental Affairs.

    • Monday, October 16, 2017
    • 9:00 AM
    • Tuesday, October 17, 2017
    • 5:00 PM
    • Ecology Central Regional Office, Yakima (Union Gap)
    • 29

    This newly revised two-day course will increase your ability to design, conduct, and control meetings in public forums. This course is designed to increase your ability to plan and facilitate a meeting (or a series of meetings) that minimize conflict and enhance problem solving. Collaboration is often cited as a good way to address coastal resource management issues, but the collaborative process is complicated, requiring a systematic approach. This course provides the skills and tools to design and implement collaborative approaches. The skills will be useful even when attending, but not running, a collaborative meeting.


    After completing this course, you will be able to:

    • Determine if a collaborative process is appropriate
    • Select people with the skill sets needed to fill each meeting role
    • Learn and practice facilitation skills
    • Use appropriate process tools and techniques to address the meeting objectives
    • Manage conflict in meetings by understanding group dynamics
    • Identify disruptive behaviors in group processes and practice strategies to deal with them

    This course is taught by national trainers from NOAA's Office for Coastal Management and is a special offering in this year's training schedule. (14 CM AICP credits/ CEP points)


    Lunch is provided.


    Instructors:  Ann Weaver joined NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management in 2004 as a program and training specialist. Her responsibilities include conducting trainings on public issues and conflict management, project design, and evaluation, and coastal community planning and development.  Ms. Weaver obtained her bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from the University of Washington, and her master’s degree in biology at Florida Atlantic University. She has extensive experience as a trainer in the public and private sector.


    Gwen Shaughnessy brings a background in marine biology and non-traditional education to NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management (OCM), which she joined in 2011. In her current role as the Climate Adaptation Specialist in the OCM Engagement, Training, and Education Program, Ms. Shaughnessy is the national coordinator and lead trainer for a multi-day climate adaptation training course.  Building capacity in local communities to better understand the risks, strategies, and choices for how to adapt to the impacts of a changing climate is a focus of Ms. Shaughnessy’s work.

    • Thursday, November 02, 2017
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    This class will teach you how to effectively use the Hydric Soil Indicators in the Regional Supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual. You will learn the basic processes that take place in saturated soil, and how to “read the story” in a soil profile. The training includes an introduction to identifying layers, distinguishing concentrations and depletions, and preparing hydric soil descriptions from soil profiles. Each student will have a chance to describe soil profiles and apply the field indicators to their notes.

     

    This workshop will be indoors, with an exercise in the field. Please dress appropriately. (6.5 CM AICP Credits/ CEP Points)

     

    Required class materials to bring:

    • A copy of the Munsell Soil Color Charts and one of the following publications:
    • The Corps Regional Supplement for Western Mountains, Valleys, and Coast Region, or Arid West Region. They can be found at: http://www.usace.army.mil/Portals/2/docs/civilworks/regulatory/reg_supp/west_mt_finalsupp.pdf
    • Or The Field Indicators for Hydric Soils (updated version 8.1) This can be found at: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs142p2_053171.pdf
    • a sharpshooter or tile spade style shovel (if you have one)
    • soil knife
    • tape measure
    • spray bottle for water (if you have one)

    Lunch is provided.


    Instructor: Bob Thomas is a biologist and soil scientist for the Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, Regulatory Branch Branch.  He has extensive experience in the Pacific Northwest in routine delineations, delineations in disturbed areas, and problematic hydric soils.  Mr. Thomas has been teaching hydric soil and delineation workshops to professional groups and agencies since 2000.


    • Thursday, November 02, 2017
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon

     

    If the class is full, please sign up for this waiting list. We will contact you if a space becomes available.   

     

    (The waiting list also helps us know how much demand there is for a course.)
    • Tuesday, November 28, 2017
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, November 30, 2017
    • 5:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 22

    This extremely popular 3-day training will provide you with improved skills for effectively participating in complex environmental negotiations. It will give you a better understanding of negotiation principles, approaches, and practices which will significantly improve the outcome of your negotiations.

    The class presents basic negotiation concepts (e.g., Fisher and Ury’s “Getting to Yes” series) and specific environmental issue applications. The skills taught help reduce anxiety about negotiating while helping you to achieve successful outcomes.
     

    You will learn:

    • Simple processes to prepare for negotiations
    • Negotiation principles through simulations and role playing of increasing complexity
    • Principled (ethical) negotiation approaches to build trust and relationships
    • To recognize commonly encountered tactics and shown productive responses

    (21 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)


    Lunch is provided.

    Instructor:  Jim Nelson held several responsible positions with the California Department of Fish and Game until he retired at the end of 2006. While with DFG he worked on a wide variety projects including: habitat conservation and management projects, regional conservation planning projects, public information and outreach, and large-scale construction monitoring projects. Since the early 1990's Jim has pursued the study and practice of facilitation, negotiation, and mediation for environmental problem solving.

    **For the past 6 years, Jim has taught this class to nearly 500 Department of Ecology employees. This training has the reputation for being the best class Ecology has ever offered.

    • Tuesday, December 12, 2017
    • 9:00 AM
    • Wednesday, December 13, 2017
    • 4:30 PM
    • Pierce Co. Environmental Services Building, Tacoma (University Place)
    • 24


    This two-day course is being offered for the second time as part of the Coastal Training Program's "Climate Adaptation Series." This training will help you:

    • Apply the basic elements of an adaptation planning framework to organize future preparedness efforts;
    • Translate climate science into impacts on local community assets;
    • Practice a qualitative approach to scope and compile a vulnerability assessment, and describe how to apply the results;
    • Identify, compare, and prioritize locally relevant adaptation strategies and actions;
    • Describe implementation options for different strategies;
    • Recognize the importance of stakeholder involvement in adaptation planning and demonstrate the applicability of engagement processes and tools.
    Opportunities for local collaboration and next steps for adaptation planning and implementation are emphasized through discussion, participant activities, and incorporation of local speakers and examples.


    The course is designed for, but not limited to, program administrators, land use planners, public works staff members, floodplain managers, hazard mitigation planners, emergency managers, community groups, members of civic organizations, and coastal resource managers. While the course is beneficial for individuals, we strongly encourage multiple members of your agency to attend. This will allow your group to work through challenging issues together to explore co-benefits of adaptation strategies. Note: This class includes inland shorelines, as well. (14 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)


    Lunch is provided.


    Incentives for group participation! For every two people attending from your agency, a third person may attend for free. To take advantage of this incentive, please send a message to Cathy Angell, cangell@padillabay.gov with the following information:

    1) Names of all three attendees

    2) A brief explanation of how you would work together on this issue.


    Please do not register the third person - CTP Staff will add them to the roster and waive their fee.



    Instructors:  John Rozum is a land use and geospatial training specialist for the Baldwin Group at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office for Coastal Management. John is extensively involved in numerous climate change–related trainings and projects, with a primary focus on the integration of geospatial tools and analysis into climate adaptation planning activities. He also has considerable experience helping communities integrate green infrastructure practices into their plans and regulations.  John is a certified land use planner with over 15 years’ experience working at the local level as a consultant, a planning commissioner and a university educator.  In 2013, he co-authored a publication entitled, Tools for Coastal Climate Adaptation Planning that is freely available at: www.natureserve.org/climatetoolsguide/. As of 2015, over 4,000 copies of the guide have been distributed worldwide.


    Gwen Shaughnessy brings a background in marine biology and non-traditional education to NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management (OCM), where she joined in February of 2011. In her current role as the Climate Adaptation Specialist in the OCM Engagement, Training, and Education Program, Ms. Shaughnessy is the national coordinator and lead trainer for a multi-day climate adaptation training course. Prior to joining NOAA, Ms. Shaughnessy worked with the Maryland Chesapeake & Coastal Program, where she helped staff the Adaptation and Response Working Group for the Maryland Commission on Climate Change and contributed to the State’s Climate Action Plan. Her responsibilities also included development of the CoastSmart Communities Initiative, a program designed to improve community resilience in the face of coastal hazards and climate change. Building capacity in local communities to better understand the risks, strategies, and choices for how to adapt to the impacts of a changing climate is a focus of Ms. Shaughnessy’s work.


Past events

Wednesday, June 28, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 14, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Tuesday, June 13, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 07, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Tuesday, June 06, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, May 25, 2017 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 Enhancing Your Presentations: Additional Techniques for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 02, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, April 20, 2017 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Thursday, April 13, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 16, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Wednesday, February 01, 2017 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, January 19, 2017 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, January 11, 2017 How to Communicate about Sea Level Rise
Tuesday, December 06, 2016 Planning Effective Projects
Tuesday, November 08, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, November 03, 2016 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Thursday, October 13, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Identifying Wetlands of High Conservation Value Using Vegetation Classification and the Ecological Integrity Assessment (EIA)
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Thursday, June 09, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, June 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, June 02, 2016 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 04, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, April 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, April 06, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, March 22, 2016 Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
Wednesday, March 02, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Tuesday, February 23, 2016 Environmental Negotiations
Thursday, February 18, 2016 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, February 03, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)
Thursday, January 14, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Tuesday, December 01, 2015 Climate Adaptation for Coastal Communities
Thursday, November 19, 2015 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, October 08, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, September 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, June 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Thursday, May 28, 2015 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 Environmental Negotiations
Wednesday, May 06, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, April 16, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Eastern Washington
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 12, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Western Washington - $95
Thursday, March 05, 2015 How to Administer Development Permits in Eastern Washington’s Shorelines - $75
Thursday, February 26, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials - $125
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $190
Thursday, February 05, 2015 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $95
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25

Washington State Department of Ecology 

 

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